1001 Arabian Nights - Supplemental Nights - Volume 13 by Sir Richard Francis Burton (Translator)

By Sir Richard Francis Burton (Translator)

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Example text

FN#109] And forthright he cried to her, "Say whatso thou wantest of me? --And Shahrazad was surprised by the dawn of day and ceased to say her permitted say. " The Jinni disappeared for an eye-twinkle and returned with a mighty fine tray and precious of price, for that 'twas all in virginal silver and upon it stood twelve golden platters of meats manifold and dainties delicate, with bread snowier than snow; also two silvern cups and as many black jacks[FN#111] full of wine clear-strained and long-stored.

FN#93] So arise straightway and go down the stairs, strengthening thy purpose and girding the loins of resolution: moreover fear not for thou art now a man and no longer a child. " Accordingly, Alaeddin arose and descended into the souterrain, where he found the four halls, each containing four jars of gold and these he passed by, as the Maroccan had bidden him, with the utmost care and caution. Thence he fared into the garden and walked along its length until he entered the saloon, where he mounted the ladder and took the Lamp which he extinguished, pouring out the oil which was therein, and placed it in his breast-pocket.

Accordingly, he presently became ware that the tree-fruits, wherewith he had filled his pockets what time he entered the Enchanted Treasury, were neither glass nor crystal but gems rich and rare; and he understood that he had acquired immense wealth such as the Kings never can possess. He then considered all the precious stones which were in the Jewellers' Quarter, but found that their biggest was not worth his smallest. "--And Shahrazad was surprised by the dawn of day and ceased to say her permitted say.

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